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4 updates to the Stuff to Know site you need to know


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August 6, 2018

For the past two years, employees have benefited from the resources provided by the original Stuff to Know site on the Roundup Web internal website. Its purpose was to provide answers to questions a typical employee may ask … or be asked. Beginning in June, the NASA Johnson Space Center’s External Relations Office began the task of updating and optimizing the site. Here are four of the main differences you’ll find with the new and improved resource directory.
 
1. Icons and blocked sections
The first thing you will notice is a new look. The new sections are now easier to navigate with corresponding icons throughout the page. There are also blue blocks around individual sections to provide more clarity to the grouping.

Icons and blocked sections example

2. Reduced number of sections and links

Below is an image of just the top half of the Stuff to Know site before the update. You can see how the collection may have been overwhelming before, with more than 14 different sections containing a total of 81 links. After weeding through each individual link, 27 were discovered to be out of date or nonfunctional. The web update provides Johnson employees with the most accurate links for each of the 10 sections, adding up to 54 total links.

Reduced number of sections and links example

3. Two brand-new sections
Names and individual sections were tinkered with to create the simplest navigation for the employees. Part of making this a reality was being sure each potential question was represented clearly. Friends and awards sections were added to the list of sections to help employees answer any of the most common questions that they will be asked versus the questions they might have for themselves.
Awards info example
Resources for friends example

4. Mars and Orion resource banks
The original site was filled with presentation resources and news for the International Space Station, as well as what employees needed to be able to share about our orbiting science lab. To build on that collection, links to Mars and Orion presentation portfolios were added. Using these links and more in the section, it’s easier than ever to include accurate and up-to-date charts for any upcoming presentation.

Mars and Orion resource banks example


Suzzy Kalu
NASA Johnson Space Center