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Orion program invites JSC team to All Hands


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May 22, 2018

With support from organizations across Johnson Space Center, the Orion Program is flying two critical flight tests within two years and is on the verge of achieving a flight tempo to support human spaceflight missions to the moon and beyond. 

NASA and Lockheed Martin Orion Program Managers Mark Kirasich and Mike Hawes will host an All Hands Wednesday, May 23, at 2 p.m. in the Teague Auditorium. 

Jon Olansen, project manager for the Ascent Abort-2 crew module, shows Mark Kirsch, Orion Program Manager, progress on the test article in Building 9S. Image Credit: NASA
Jon Olansen, project manager for the Ascent Abort-2 crew module, shows Mark Kirasich, Orion Program Manager, progress on the test article in Building 9S. Image Credit: NASA/David DeHoyos

As the program transitions from development into production and operations, the joint NASA Orion and prime contractor Lockheed Martin teams are evolving the way they do business to get “flight ready.” To share perspective in their roles, guest speakers from the organizations across Johnson who work on Orion include:
 
  • Chuck Dingell, Orion Chief Engineer, Engineering Directorate
  • Susan Baggerman – Orion Health & Medical, Human Health & Performance Directorate
  • Kevin McClam – Orion Safety and Mission Assurance, Safety & Mission Assurance Directorate
  • Nicole Mann – NASA Astronaut, Flight Operations Directorate
The speakers will take questions from the audience following the presentations, and questions can be submitted in advance via email

We hope you can join us Wednesday!

Orion’s Exploration Mission-1 crew module sits in the assembly fixture at the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Image Credit: NASA
Orion’s Exploration Mission-1 crew module sits in the assembly fixture at the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Image Credit: NASA
 
  • Within a year from now, a test of Orion’s launch abort system called Ascent Abort-2, will help ensure the spacecraft can carry the crew to safety if an emergency ever arises during launch as they start their journey to deep space.
  • Targeted for December 2019, Exploration Mission-1 will fly about 40,000 miles beyond the moon and back as the first integrated test of NASA’s deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System rocket and the ground systems at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.